What Is Liquidation Price?

To get the complete picture of what liquidation price means in relation to what liquidation is and to understand how losses work in leveraged trading I would recommend first reading these guides:

In this article, I will break down the concept of the liquidation price which is misunderstood among most beginner traders since the nature of how it is calculated might seem complicated at first glance.

Key takeaways

  • Liquidation price is the distance from your entry price to the price where your leveraged position gets liquidated due to a loss.
  • The greater the amount of leverage, the shorter the distance becomes from your entry price to your liquidation price, increasing the risk of liquidation.
  • The liquidation price can be calculated by using a liquidation price formula that is derived from the chosen leverage ratio.

Liquidation price explained

The liquidation price is the distance from the entry price of your leveraged position to where it gets liquidated.

Remember, a liquidation can only happen in a leveraged market with at least a 1:2 leverage ratio.

At a leverage ratio of 1:2, the distance to your liquidation price will be 50% from your entry price.

This is easy to remember as 1:2 cuts the liquidation price in half, hence the 50% distance.

When trading without leverage, liquidation is not a factor.

Your position can fall indefinitely without leverage, but it can never get liquidated.

Now, below is a chart of BNB/USD to illustrate how liquidation price works at a 1:2 leverage ratio.

The entry price of the trade is $277 and with a 1:2 leverage ratio, the distance to your liquidation price is 50%.

Liquidation price

This means that once you reach a loss of -50% with a leverage ratio of 1:2 your position will get liquidated.

As you increase the leverage, the distance from your entry price to the liquidation price shrinks.

  • At a leverage ratio of 1:3, your liquidation price will be 33% from your entry price.
  • At a leverage ratio of 1:4, your liquidation price will be 25% from your entry price.
  • At a leverage ratio of 1:5, your liquidation price will be 20% from your entry price.

You can see how the distance shrinks with the increase of leverage.

This can further be illustrated with a chart/table to show you how the relationship between leverage and liquidation price works.

The table below shows leverage ratios from 1:1 – 1:100 with the corresponding price of liquidation.

For each position, are assume that the trader is trading BTC/USD and the entry price will always be $20.000. From here we calculate the liquidation price.

Leverage Ratio1:11:21:51:101:151:201:351:501:751:100
Liquidation price$10.000$16.000$18.000$18.668$19.000$19.428$19.600$19.734$19.800
Liquidation distance (%)-50%-20%-10%-6.66%-5.00%-2.86%-2.00%-1.33%-1.00%

To calculate the liquidation price for a leverage ratio of more than 1:100 see the formula below.

What is the meaning of liquidation price?

The meaning of the liquidation price is:

  • To indicate at which price level your losses would mount up to the total value of your account balance.
  • To give a representation of the maximum risk for each leveraged position.
  • To help traders adjust their risk profile.

There are two factors that play a big role in why the liquidation price exists in the first place.

This concept would not exist without leverage and how margin accounts function.

When you open a position with leverage you are opening a position that is larger than your total account balance.

Liquidation price is a factor since all your losses are deducted from your margin balance and not the total position size including leverage.

Suppost you have $800 in your forex account and you enter a trade with 1:2 leverage.

This would give you a total position value of $1600 which is twice the size of your initial deposit.

Since your account balance can only cover losses up to $800, your position will get closed out when this loss has been reached, which is at -50% of the total trade value $1600.

On the contrary, when you trade without leverage, your account balance will be able to cover all the losses until the underlying asset falls to literally $0.

How to calculate the liquidation price

To calculate the liquidation price you first need to know at which leverage ratio you are trading.

Let’s say that you are trading a leverage ratio of 1:65.

The first step is to calculate distance to your liquidation point in percentage.

To do this simply divide 100 by 65.

100 / 65 = 1.54%

Now you know that your liquidation price is 1.54% away from your entry price.

All that is left to do is to calculate 1.54% below the entry price of the asset you are currently trading.

As an example, we assume that you are trading the Tesla stock which is currently priced at $233.

Now, deduct -1.54% from the price of $233.

233 x 0.0154 = $3.60

The last step is to subtract this from the entry price.

233 – 3.60 = $229.40

The liquidation price in this example is $229.40.

Liquidation price formula

Here is a summary of the liquidation price formula.

Calculate liquidation distance in percentage = 100 / Leverage Ratio (100/65 = 1.54%)

Calculate the liquidation distance in price = Current Asset Price x Distance In Percentage ($233 x 0.0154% = $3.60)

Calculate the liquidation price = Current Asset Price – Liquidation Price Distance ($233 – $3.60 = $229.40)

What does liquidation mean?

Liquidation is a total loss of funds due to outsized losses.

A liquidation happens when your overall losses exceeds your total account balance.

This is a way for the forex broker or the leveraged trading platform to prevent you from going into debt and losing more than you have in your account.

Without the liquidation feature most traders who used leveraged accounts would lose a lot more money.

How liquidation works

Liquidaiton is an automatic process that is controlled and executed by the broker.

Once your margin requirement hits 0% and your asset price has reached the liquidation price all your open positions are closed ut and all your funds in your account are lost.

Once the liquidation is in process, you open positions will be sold back to the market with a market order.

Before a liquidation the trader will receive a warning signal called a margin call.

This warning is meant to warn the trader that the open losses are close to reaching the full value of the account.

If nothing is done to prevent further losses the account will get liquidated once the losses reach the threshold.

Examples that describe liquidation price

I will give you two different examples that describes this concept.

In the first example Trader A will use a leverage ratio of 1:25 and in the second example Trader B will use a leverage ratio of 1:175.

Example 1

Trader A is trading Bitcoin with a leverage ratio of 1:25.

The current price of Bitcoin is $19,419.

If we use the same formula as above the liquidation price in this case would be:

100 / 25 = 4%

$19,419 x 0.04 = $776.50

$19,419 – $776.50 = $18,642.50

Example 2

Trade B is trading the Nasdaq index with a leverage ratio of 1:175.

The current price of Nasdaq is $10,652.

We use the same formula to calculate the liquidation price, here is the result:

100 / 175 = 0.57%

$10,652 x 0.0057 = $60,70

$10,652 – $60,70 = $10,591.30

How to prevent leverage account liquidation

There are several ways to prevent liquidation depending on what market and what kind of broker you choose.

Here are my best tips:

  1. Use a stop loss – A stop loss is a protective risk management tool that prevents further losses from happening. With a stop loss you can choose the maximum loss per position either with a dollar value or with a percentage value.
  2. Trade with a lower leverage ratio – If you have read this article fro the top you will begin to understand that the risk of getting liquidated increases with increased leverage. Thus, using a lower leverage ratio will significantly reduce the chances of getting liquidated. This is why we have created these guides:
  3. Use isolated margin when possibleIsolated margin is a way of isolating all losses to once position only. When isolated margin is used, only that one position can get liquidated. This prevents the whole account from getting liquidated from one bad trade. Most crypto leverage trading platforms and exchanges offer this security features but also some CFD brokers and forex brokers.
  4. Trade fewer markets – When trading fewer markets it is easier to maintain control over your positions and your losses. Beginners traders who trade several markets at the same time with high leverage ratios usually suffer more frequent liquidations.
  5. Learn how to calculate leverage – By calculating your leverage before you enter the market you can set yourself up for success. This is one of the best ways to take control over your positions and your risk in general. Use our calculators below to calculate your margin requirements.

How to calculate liquidation loss

There are two ways of calculating liquidation loss.

It can either be an account wide liqiodation or a position liquidation.

  1. Full account liquidation – If your total account suffers a liquidation then the total loss will be the amount taht your deposited into your account.
  2. Position liquidation – If your position gets liquidated then the total amount is the margin requirement that went into opening that positon.

If your total account balance is $800 and your whole account gets liquidated then your total loss is $800.

However, if your total account balance is $800 but you only use $200 as margin requirement and your position gets liquidated then your total loss would be $200.

Can you get liquidated in spot trading?

No, it is not possible to get liquidated in a spot market since there is no leverage attached to the positions.

Only a leveraged position can get liquidated.

Positions in spot trading can fall in price and lose as much as 99.99% until the value of the asset literally hits zero in value.

To understand this concept further read our guide:


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